Category Archives: Activity

Condors of Ecuador’s Andes

ecuador-andes-condorsBefore the arrival of the Spaniards, settled cultures in what is now known as Ecuador were guided by deities. The Incas believed condors were the messengers of the gods. Sociologist Dimitri Peñasco says the condor is believed to lead the dead into an upper realm, called Hanan Pacha. This realm included the sky, sun, moon, stars, planets and constellations. The condor is also said to be able to morph into human form. This has been the inspiration for many legends.

It is Ecuador’s national bird, depicted on the flag and coat of arms as a symbol of bravery and power. Andean condors are one of the largest birds, with wingspans of up to 10 feet. Females lay their eggs in steep, rocky areas to protect them from predators. They can mainly be found in five areas of the country: Antisana Eco Reserve, Cotacachi-Cayapas Eco Reserve, Zuleta in Imbabura province, the Nabón region in Azuay province and Cajas National Park.

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Whale watching off Ecuador’s Pacific coast

humpback-whale-infographicJuly and August are the peak months for whale watching in Ecuador, as hundreds of humpbacks put on spectacular mating displays, physical and audible. They’ve come all the way from Antarctica for the warmer waters of the equatorial Pacific coastline, and boat operators haven’t seen a peak in human interest yet. Tourists are still on the rise, year on year.

Tours are normally an afternoon, or a whole day, usually with 6-12 passengers. Needless to say, longer tours increase whale viewings and the chance of a perfect encounter: a giant adult male exhibiting powerful displays at the ocean’s surface: arching, chest flapping, exposing flippers, tail-waving/slapping, head-slapping, and breaching (the most dramatic of all).

< Click the image to view the full infographic :)

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Ecuador’s Andes: The best hikes (Imbabura)

Mojanda-campingThough dwarfed by its larger neighbors, Ecuador boasts one of the planet’s densest volcanic regions, including over a dozen craters on the Galapagos islands. One of Ecuador’s top volcanic areas is Imbabura in the north: lagoon country. It’s a favorite for active people, as well as anyone seeking relaxation or solitude.

Here are three easy and excellent hikes, ideally allocating at least one whole day for each. Regular hiking boots are sufficient, while camping gear and a week’s worth of food & water is recommended for the adventurous. Get out into the wild, and savor every second of the high-altitude, diverse and captivating experience!

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The Way to Machu Picchu

inca-trailThe Inca Empire at its zenith stretched along the Andes from the very south of Colombia, down through Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Chile and northwest Argentina.

It all began in the agricultural region of Cusco, Peru. The iconic Machu Picchu is several days’ trek from Cusco, probably built as an estate for the first Inca emperor Pachacuti (1438–1472). Never discovered by Spanish conquerors, and thus covered in vegetation when revealed to the world in 1911, its location is undoubtedly fit for royalty.

In the saddle of two adjoining mountains inside a U-turn bend of the Urubamba river, surrounded by mountain ranges on all sides, Machu Picchu was built for security as well as beauty. The distinctive peak of Huayna Picchu is regularly bathed in morning mist from the river below, and having only two access points, the site was easily defended.

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Amazon River Boat Cruises

Manatee-AnakondaTo go deep into the lower Amazon basin, where biodiversity is highest, an extended canoe ride is a usual element of the trip. Though there are many wonderful rainforest lodges in Ecuador, only two cruise boats are licensed to operate along the Napo River, which courses through all the main highlights of the Ecuadorian jungle.

Cruises vastly increase the range of attractions one is able to visit, since lodges rarely offer excursions to places more than a few hours away. In one week, a cruise boat will travel over 100 miles to the Amazonian border with Peru. There are also half-week cruises.

The two available boats are the Manatee and the Anakonda, catering for lower and higher budgets respectively. Their itineraries are identical, with the only likely differences arising due to weather and other unforeseeables. Both boats are equipped with canoes for all passengers, and experienced guides accompany guests on all excursions.

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